FMLA Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993

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FMLA Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993

What is the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA)?

The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, also known as FMLA, is a federal statute that requires employers to provide workers with up to 12 weeks of earned leave each year for personal and family reasons. The act allows employees to take unpaid leave for many reasons, including the birth of a child, the treatment of a family member with a severe health condition, or the care of a family member who is a military service member with a severe health condition. Although this form of leave is unpaid, health care insurance must be maintained, and the job remains protected.

 

History of FMLA

In the presidency of Bill Clinton, on February 5th, 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act was signed and implemented on August 5th, 1993. The purpose of the Family and Medical Leave Act was that parents’ participation in early child rearing or parenting is a key part of the development of children.

 

What Are the Eligibility Criteria for FMLA?

  • Employee(s) must work in an organization having 50 or more employees within a 75-mile radius of their worksite.
  • Employee(s) must have served a minimum of 12 months and worked 1,250 hours within the past 12 months in the same organization.

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Related: Medical Leave of AbsenceSick Leave Pay, Leave of AbsenceBereavement Leave, Disability Leave